30 Amazing Facts About Stephen King Most People Haven't Heard.

Stephen King, on many parameters, is the most successful American author of all time. His stories have almost all been adapted to the big and small screen, and his influence on the American psyche is truly amazing.

Here are thirty things you may not have known about the famed writer.


Check out more facts from the source at the end of this article!


1/30. A recovering alcoholic, King noted in his book "On Writing" that he was drunk virtually the whole time of writing the book "Cujo" and to this day barely remembers writing any of it.

2/30. Bryan Smith, the driver of the van that hit King, died. King said in a statement, "I was very sorry to hear of the passing of Bryan Smith.The death of a 43-year-old man can only be termed untimely." He suffered a broken leg, a bruised lung and a head laceration. The driver of the van was distracted by his dog. King was found lying in a depression about 14 feet off the road and appeared to have been thrown by the collision. The van's windshield was broken and the right front corner of the car was crunched in from the impact of striking King. Newspapers reported that he has bought the van that hit him on June; he plans to hammer it to pieces on the anniversary of the accident.

3/30. In 2009 he fulfilled a lifetime ambition, expressed in Salem's Lot, of being interviewed in Playboy Magazine. The Magazine also published a poem by King, entitled "The Bone Church", which featured the immortal line "And balls to your grinning face!".

4/30. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for distinguished contribution to American letters.

5/30. He's a huge fan of the hit ABC TV show Lost (2004), which often makes references to his works. He even trusted J.J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof to adapt the "Dark Tower" series into a film series.


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6/30. In his novel Doctor Sleep, he uses the line "the hand that rocks the cradle is the hand that rules the world"; Rebecca De Mornay was the star of the movie of the same name and played Wendy Torrance in the miniseries version of King's The Shining.

7/30. He has never censored his own work. The death of Dr. Jimmy Cody in "Salem's Lot" was cut due to the demands of the editor at Doubleday, which King acquiesced to because his career was still in its infancy.

8/30. In the 1980s he was battling a cocaine addiction. At one time his wife organized a group of family and friends and confronted him. She dumped onto the floor his trashcan, which included beer cans, cigarette butts, cough and cold medicines and various drug paraphernalia. Her message to him was: "Get help or get out. We love you, but we don't want to witness your suicide." He got help and was able to become clean and sober.

9/30. King published seven novels ("Rage", "The Long Walk", "Roadwork", "The Running Man", "Thinner", "The Regulators" and "Blaze") under the pseudonym Richard Bachman.

10/30. Portions of King's writings from when he was 9 years old appeared in the 1993 book, "First Words", edited by Paul Mandelbaum.

11/30. It is falsely rumored that he will not sign autographs because of superstition. Actually, he doesn't sign them because he hates the idolatry of celebrities (he also will not endorse an official fan club for the same reason). He will sign autographs now only at book signings, according to his official website. Another rumor (perhaps started by King) claims that, if sent a book to sign, he will burn it and return the ashes. This is also untrue and was debunked by his official website.


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12/30. Met his wife Tabitha King while the two were working at the Fogler Library as students at the University of Maine in Orono, Maine.

13/30. He used to work for a dry cleaner before publishing his first novel.

14/30. He wrote "The Running Man", a 304-page novel, in only ten days.

15/30. King is certified by Guinness Superlatives (the "Book of World Records" group) as having the most number of motion picture adaptations by a living author.

16/30. In 1992 he and wife Tabitha King gave a donation to build Mansfield Stadium in Bangor, Maine. The only condition Stephen had was that the score board would be placed such that he could see it from his house while working. In August of 2002 he threw the first pitch at the opening of the Senior League Baseball World Series. The Kings were honored for their generosity with an inscribed stone monument shaped like a home plate.


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17/30. His short story "The Man in the Black Suit" won an O. Henry Award for Best Short Story in 1996.

18/30. He is an avid Red Sox fan. Before the Sox won the 2004 World Series, he said he wanted his tombstone epitaph to be a single sock and the line "Not In My Lifetime, Not In Yours, Either."

19/30. Often listens to hard rock music during the time he writes to get inspired. He also plays in a rock band himself.

20/30. King is good friends with horror director George A. Romero.

21/30. He wrote reviews of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series for Entertainment Weekly magazine.

22/30. Is a member of a band called the Rock Bottom Remainders, which is composed of other writers. Besides King the members include Dave Barry, Ridley Pearson, Scott Turow, Amy Tan, James Luca McBride, Mitch Albom, Roy Blount Jr., Matt Groening, Kathi Kamen Goldmark and Greg Iles. A "remainder" is a book that has not sold well and has been drastically reduced in price to ensure a quick sale.


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23/30. In his book "On Writing", he states that as punishment for making fun of Ellen Margitan, the vice principal of Lisbon High, he is sent to the offices of the Lisbon Enterprise to work with the editor, John Gould which he states is not "the" John Gould. In fact, it was "the" John Gould, famous Maine humorist and it was John Gould that helped King develop into a writer that people wanted to read.

24/30. After watching the first cut of Rob Reiner 's Stand by Me (1986), he was said to be crying and stated it was the closest adaptation to one of his novels he'd ever seen.

25/30. When it was discovered in 1985 that he and Richard Bachman were one and the same, he retired the use of that name. He resurrected Bachman about a decade later, using the name as the author of The Regulators, a companion piece to his own novel Desperation. Since then, he has issued other new novels using the name Bachman, with the dust jackets jokingly claiming the books to have been a posthumous discovery by Bachman's widow. Bachman is said to have died in 1985 from "Cancer of the Pseudonym".

26/30. As a little boy he had a recurring nightmare in which he entered a room and saw a suicide victim hanging from the ceiling. He later incorporated this scene into an early book, Salem's Lot.


27/30. Famously disliked Stanley Kubrick's The Shining (1980), which was adapted from his novel of the same name. He lamented that many story elements, some of them autobiographical and important to King, had not been included, such as alcoholism and his father issue. King therefore produced a mini series of The Shining (1997) that follows his novel more closely, but is generally regarded as inferior to Kubrick's interpretation.


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28/30. A rumor circulated for years that he did not want to complete his novel "Pet Sematary" as it frightened him to do any writing for it. King or Doubleday (the publisher) may have started the story and while not exactly true it is partially based in fact. King fell into a depression while writing it and had no desire to complete it while feeling the strong melancholy.

29/30. Horror director George A. Romero was one of King's childhood heroes. The two are now close friends.

30/30. King writes for 3-4 hours a day. He used to write 2000-3000 words a day, these days he usually aims for about 1000.


Source.

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