36 Facts About The Making Of 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' That Most Fans Don't Know.

Who Framed Roger Rabbit was really a revolutionary idea: bring together the beloved cartoon characters from both Warner Brothers and Disney and bring them into the real world.

Almost thirty years later it's hard to appreciate the amount of work that went into pulling it off, but this list of facts may help with that.

Here are thirty-six things most fans don't know about the making of the film.

You can check out more facts from the source at the end of this article!


1/36. Bob Hoskins claimed that Jessica Rabbit was not yet sketched by the animators when filming wrapped and he had no idea what the character would look like. Robert Zemeckis told Hoskins to imagine his ideal sexual fantasy. Hoskins claimed that his mental image was less risqu than what Jessica looked like in the completed film.

2/36. During filming, Charles Fleischer delivered Roger Rabbit's lines off camera in full Roger costume including rabbit ears, yellow gloves and orange cover-alls. During breaks when he was in costume, other staff at the studios would see him and make comments about the poor caliber of the effects in the "rabbit movie".

3/36. Tim Curry auditioned for the role of Judge Doom, but he gave a performance that Robert Zemeckis, Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and Michael Eisner all found quite terrifying.This movie marked the only time cartoon characters from both Walt Disney and Warner Brothers appeared together on screen.

4/36. To give Jessica's ample bosom an unusual bounce, her supervising animator Russell Hall reversed the natural up-down movements of her breasts as she walked: they bounce up when a real woman's breasts bounce down and vice versa.

5/36. Bob Hoskins said that, for two weeks after seeing the movie, his young son wouldn't talk to him. When finally asked why, his son said he couldn't believe his father would work with cartoon characters such as Bugs Bunny and not let him meet them.

6/36. The Ink and Paint Club's policy of only letting toons onto the premises as entertainers and employees, not as customers or audience members, is a reference to the real-life Cotton Club, which, along with many other segregated clubs before the Civil Rights movement, only allowed Black people to enter as performers.


Continue this article on the next page!


7/36. Since the movie was being made by Disney, Warner Brothers would only allow the use of their biggest toon stars, Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, if they got an equal amount of screen time as Disney's biggest stars, Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck. Because of this, both sets of characters are always together in frame when on the screen.

8/36. The three ingredients of the dip which 'kills' toons, (turpentine, benzene and acetone) are all paint thinners which are used to remove animation from cels.

9/36. With an estimated production budget of $70 million at the time of its release, Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) was the most expensive film produced in the 1980s and had the longest on-screen credits for a film.

10/36. The first test audience was comprised mostly of 18-19-year-olds, who hated it. After nearly the entire audience walked out of the screening, Robert Zemeckis, who had final cut, said he wasn't changing a thing.

11/36. Pay close attention to Christopher Lloyd's performance as Judge Doom. In every shot where he's not wearing his shades, he never blinks.

12/36. Every frame of the movie which featured a mixture of animation and live action had to be printed up as a still photograph. An animator would then draw the particular illustration for that frame on tracing paper set on top of the photo. The outline drawing then had to be hand-colored. Once that was done, the drawing had to be composited back into the original frame using an optical printer.


Continue this article on the next page!


13/36. When Eddie takes Roger Rabbit into the back room at the bar where Dolores works to cut apart the hand-cuffs, the lamp from ceiling is bumped and swinging. Lots of extra work was needed to make the shadows match between the actual room shots and the animation for very little viewer benefit. Today, "Bump the Lamp" is a term used by many Disney employees to refer to going that extra mile on an effect just to make it a little more special, even though most viewers or guests will never notice it.

14/36. Jessica Rabbit's speaking voice was performed by Kathleen Turner, and her singing voice was performed by Amy Irving. Turner was uncredited.

15/36. When the toon train hits the Dip Machine, each window of the train shows a murder or death taking place (if viewed frame-by-frame).

16/36. Although the film's title is a question, no question mark appears in the title, as this is considered bad luck in the industry.

17/36. When the Special Edition DVD was released, Robert Zemeckis stated in an interview for a newspaper that Bill Murray was his and producer Steven Spielberg's original choice for the role of Eddie Valiant but neither could get in contact with him in time. Bill Murray states in interviews that when he read the interview he was in a public place at the time but he still screamed his lungs out, because he would have definitely accepted the role.

18/36. Several voice actors make cameos as the voice of the character(s) they have played before. These are Tony Anselmo (Donald Duck), Wayne Allwine (Mickey Mouse) and Mel Blanc (Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Sylvester and Tweety Bird). But most noticeable is Mae Questel as Betty Boop. Mae did Betty's voice from 1930 until the character was retired in 1939. Mae Questel then became Popeye the Sailor's friend, Olive Oyl.


Continue this article on the next page!


19/36. The movie's line "I'm not bad. I'm just drawn that way." was voted as the #83 of "The 100 Greatest Movie Lines" by Premiere in 2007.

20/36. Another scene that came about by accident was when Roger and Eddie Valiant arrive at Maroon Studios to interrogate Mr. Maroon. As Bob Hoskins delivered his lines, he looked straight ahead, instead of down at a three-foot rabbit. The animators decided to have Roger stand on tiptoe against the wall to cover up the gaffe.

21/36. In the original VHS release, when Eddie and Jessica are thrown out of the car, you can see for a few short frames that Jessica was not wearing any underwear. This was edited out in all future versions for obvious reasons.

22/36. The truck full of "stuff" (bowling balls, pianos, etc.) that Eddie Valiant crashes into when he returns to Toontown is labeled "ACME Overused Gags".

23/36. Initially, there were to be seven weasels (Greasy, Sleazy, Wheezy, Smartass, Psycho, Stupid, and Slimy) to parody the seven dwarfs.

24/36. Judge Doom's master plan to dismantle the Red Car trolley is based in fact. Private corporations conspired to eliminate public transit in the late 1940s and 1950s in order to generate demand for automobiles and ancillary industries to keep said automobiles running.


Continue this article on the next page!


25/36. To get the feel of acting with cartoon characters, Bob Hoskins studied his three-year-old daughter playing with her imaginary friends.

26/36. The song at the end of the film, "Smile, Darn Ya, Smile", was recorded by most of the film's animators, doing their best character voices.

27/36. During production, one of the biggest challenges faced by the makers of the film was how to get the cartoon characters to realistically interact with real on-set props. This was ultimately accomplished in two different ways. Certain props (such as Baby Herman's cigar or the plates Roger smashes over his head) were moved on-set via motion control machines hooked up to operator who would move the objects in exactly the desired manner. Then, in post, the character was simply drawn 'over' the machine. The other way of doing it was by using puppeteers. This is most clearly seen in the scene in the Ink & Paint club. The glasses held by the octopus bartender were in fact being controlled by puppeteers from above, whilst the trays carried by the penguin waiters were on sticks being controlled from below - both the wires and the sticks were simply removed in post and the cartoons added in.

28/36. The password ("Walt sent me") to enter the "Ink and Paint Club" refers to cartooning legend Walt Disney.

29/36. In the original novel, Baby Herman is 30. In the film, he is 50. The line "I got a 30-year-old lust in a 3-year-old's dinky" is lifted directly from the novel.

30/36. Jessica Rabbit was based exactly on four movie femme fatales. Writer Gary K. Wolf had based Jessica primarily on the cartoon character Red, Tex Avery's vixen from Red Hot Riding Hood (1943). (In fact, the musical number in Red Hot Riding Hood (1943) is duplicated by Jessica at the Ink and Paint Club.) In addition, animation director Richard Williams said he based Jessica mostly on Rita Hayworth in Gilda (1946), Veronica Lake for the peek-a-boo bangs of her hair, and with the suggestion of Robert Zemeckis, "the look" trademark Lauren Bacall had.


Continue this article on the next page!


31/36. Animation director Richard Williams strove for three things while creating this film's animation: Warner Bros.' Looney Tunes-type characters; Disney-quality animation and Tex Avery-style humor..."but not so brutal."

32/36. The gag of the toon pelican falling off his bicycle came about by accident. Originally, the pelican would have ridden straight past the camera, but the effects technicians were unable to keep the bike upright. The filmmakers decided to let the bicycle fall and animate the pelican losing his balance.

33/36. Robert Zemeckis keeps the stop-motion model of the flattened Judge Doom in his office.

34/36. There were over 40 drafts of the script, including drafts that had either Jessica Rabbit or Baby Herman as the villain.

35/36. The piano duet between Donald Duck and Daffy Duck was storyboarded by animation director Richard Williams and Chuck Jones, who was working as a consultant. Williams drew Donald, while Jones drew Daffy.

36/36. 326 animators worked full-time on the film. In total, 82,080 frames of animation were drawn. Including storyboards and concept art, animation director Richard Williams estimates that well over one million drawings were done for the movie.


Source.

Laws should always protect the people, ALL the people!

Laws are amiable. We know this. They often change with the times, with enough revolution that is. Laws are there to protect and serve, however they can be too complex and just downright odd and often absurd.

Redditor u/AshSpergers wanted to discuss the rules from around the world that may not make the most sense by wondering.... What's a stupid law where you live?

Keep reading... Show less