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Foreign People Reveal Which English Expressions Are Used Worldwide Like 'C'est La Vie'

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When Redditor TheNewOneIsWorse asked: "Non-native English speakers of reddit, what are some English language expressions that are commonly used in your country in the way we will use foreign phrases like 'c'est la vie' or 'hasta la vista?'" they probably didn't anticipate the responses they received. Information like this reminds us that we live in an ever more connected world.


"...and Angela Merkel even casually used it..."

The word "sh*tstorm" has entered common German parlance, and Angela Merkel even casually used it during a press conference recently.

copperreppoc

"We use the word 'random' a lot."

Swede here.

We use the word "random" a lot. My guess is that it came from the type of humour that was popular around 10 years ago for which there was no suitable word in our language. Nowadays it's used for all sorts of random events.

kioskvaltare

"People in Poland..."

People in Poland use English phrases a lot during conversations. "What the f*ck" is a standard at this point. "Easy peasy", "by the way", "whatever", "no problem" etc.

mahboilucas

"In Taiwan..."

In Taiwan we use "bye bye" a lot instead of the Chinese term for it.

10vernothin

"I'm Egyptian..."

I'm Egyptian, in my generation (I'm 26) it wasn't full phrases, but more like just words, for instance: Sorry, Okay, the number zero, and of course the classic F**k You.

The younger generation and part of my generation as well speaks a lot more English in their daily lives mainly thanks to technology such as texting and WhatsApp and so on where most of us type in Franco-Arab instead of Arabic, which naturally leads to us just using more English words when texting which eventually bleeds into our daily lives.

Iguesssowtfnot

"In Japanese..."

In Japanese, we say "don't mind" (ドンマイ) when someone messes something up, is clumsy, etc.

We also use "all right" (オーライ)to guide people backing up their cars.

japaranian

"In France..."

In France sometimes you get people saying "Mais whaaaat ?".

We say "Week end" instead of "Fin de semaine" but they say it in Quebec tho.

"Oh my god" is used sometimes.

Matrozi

"Awkward..."

Awkward, sale, shopping, commercials, binge watching, chill, relax, cool, whatever, anyway, thanks, nice, f*ck, casual, business, date/dating [Dutch]

Jack-A-Roe33

"Words like..."

In German we modify a lot of English words so we can use them. It is called "Denglish".

Words like Nice, Ok, F*ck, Nope, Hi, Hey, etc. are used a lot and we also have these Denglish sayings. (They are used to make fun of people who are not good in English)

For example: "My English is not the yellow from the egg but it goes."

it goes -> es geht -> it's not too bad

That's all I can think of right now.

ctml04

"In Russia..."

In Russia they say "super pooper" when they mean something really cool. I've tried telling people that this is not what they think it means but no one particularly listens because it rhymes (say with a russian accent). Always makes me laugh.

elonah0

"I'm Filipino..."

I'm Filipino and we use the Word/s "Nosebleed". But not in a literal sense. We use it as a phrase when someone is speaking a foreign language and we're having a hard time keeping up or understanding the accent.

twinklebutts

"My French teacher..."

Giphy

My French teacher for two years, a native French speaker, used to say "Pero why" whenever someone did or said something stupid. Since then, I've adopted the phrase.

Happyfrozenfire

"In India..."

In India (at least in big cities), we have literally brought English into our daily languages. Hindi speaking is just 50% english words as the youth has no idea how to say that one specific word in original language anymore. We call it Hinglish.

soynav

"Pretty much..."

Pretty much every Quebecois will say "that's it that's all" even if they speak no other English. I have yet to determine why this is but I hope to someday find out.

JayLoveJapan

"In Iceland..."

In Iceland we use a whole lot of english words and phrases. "Oh my god", "f*ck" and "f*cking" (or "ómægod", "fokk" og "fokking") are probably the most common. Teenagers use more, naturally. Words from hip hop are common (homie, bitch, etc.).

Sometimes these terms are translated into the language, even in roundabout ways. A recent one I heard is "jarm", for english "meme". "Jarm" is the name of the sound of a sheep ("bleat" I guess is the english term). "Me" [mɛ:] is the icelandic equivalent of "baa". Icelandic toddlers call sheep "me me". And thus "meme" became "jarm".

idontthrillyou

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Quitting a job can be a liberating feeling, but it can also be scary as hell... especially if you don't have another job waiting for you on the horizon.

Thanks to Redditor BurningDruid13, we have some answers to the following question: "Have you ever quit a job, without another lined up, for your mental health? How did it turn out?"

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