Man Shares 6 Life-Altering Moments From His Time As A Doctor In Cuba.

"You can't really understand a person unless you walk a mile in their shoes." Sometimes an eye-opening interview can work just as well.

Imgur user CubanDoctor recently interviewed a Cuban refugee about his experiences being a doctor during Fidel Castro's presidency.



1.

Was forced to watch more than 50 people die from the disease because we were no longer allowed to report it. Boss told me "they are not sick, so let them die". I couldn't handle it. I quit.

2.

Cuba is known for young prostitutes. The government locates girls and starves their family until they are willing to put their daughter in the hotels. The girls do not receive condoms, instead we were required to administer mandatory abortions every few months.

3.

Anyone who says this isn't slavery is wrong. Family went hungry for months while I was gone, and I couldn't visit or talk to them while I was gone. Emails sometimes made it through. I was sold to the highest bidder and my family was the ransom that kept me from running. While I was gone... a government worker forcibly raped my daughter. "It is a family issue".

4.

This happens once or twice a month in just about every neighborhood in Cuba. There is no consequence for this. Especially if they are an outstanding member of the revolution. The rape is done as if taking fruit in honor of the revolution.

5.

A while back Fidel Castro eradicated the island of pesticides. He replaced it with forced labor for all those who went to school. The food was rotting, the water was sewage, there was no electricity or phones. If you don't work you were beaten and starved, if you work you were beaten and raped.

6.



If a pregnancy threatens the infant mortality number, then I was to order its abortion. If I didn't do it, my family would starve and I'd be put in a cell without light for over a decade. Worse, others would get involved and in the absence of a doctor, would beat her and often rape her afterwards.

If a child was stillborn, I was not allowed to report it.

This was transcribed from conversations with a Cuban doctor who is a recent refuge. He speaks broken English. Secondary sources found here.

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In life, sometimes there's wrong and "technically not wrong" - and the difference can often be hilarious.

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