IRL

People Who Have Been Clinically Dead Reveal If They Saw Their Life Flash Before Their Eyes

Have you ever wondered what a near-death experience is like?

We've seen them dramatized in film and TV countless times. A white light, a figure, "turn back, it's not your time;" the whole shebang. But what is it actually like?


u/HymnForTheShameless asked:

[Serious] Redditors who have died temporarily/nearly died, did your life flash before your eyes? If not, what did happen?

Here were those stories.

Waking And Dying

Giphy

From my grandfather:

He has heart issues and had an internal defibrillator fitted to help his heart beat normally. To test it they stopped his heart while he was awake, but he kept talking to the doctors about the weather and normal 'old man stuff'. When his heart restarted he felt a little shock and asked "what was that? I was enjoying myself." The doctor replied "welcome back to life."

The doctor told him afterwards that he should have just stopped being awake and fallen unconscious, and thus was the only time anything like this had ever happened to one of his patients.

Stubborn old man.

JSK-4375

It Will Be Okay

My heart stopped when I was in the ER for 34 seconds, not really a "life flash" but a very calming feeling of as I describe it: "what was I even worried about? Everyone/everything is going to be fine".

greeneyeded

Naught But The Burning Road

I was hit by a car 3 years ago (11th of Feb 16), I was walking across the road with one of my friends and they crossed the road and I waited a few seconds and then crossed but I was very short at the time and couldn't see the car coming. I remember seeing the car coming on the right-hand side on me and the next thing I remember is being hit from the right side and flying through the air and landing with a thud on the side of the road and then hearing the tires screech.

Luckily the only injury I sustained was a compound fracture to both the bones in my right leg meaning the bones snapped completely in half and came out of my leg and as they snapped and came out of the skin it snapped the artery in the leg and all the nerves. I went into shock from the injury so I couldn't feel any pain besides the burning from the hot road (Australian summer weather).

I looked down at my leg and noticed the blood coming from my sock pouring all over the road and my leg bent in half and thought "Well it's broken alright". Then I just remember being surrounded by people and I called my mum and since I was in shock I wasn't distressed or crying and I called my mum and told her I was hit by a car and she didn't believe me because I was so calm she thought I was kidding.

I lost a lot of blood at this stage and had a seizure and passed out but I didn't think it was serious and I kept trying to move and get up only to be held down by bystanders. I remember this white ring in my vision and it kept getting bigger and bigger blocking my eyesight (It started from the edge of my sight closing in).

Like everyone else seems to be saying I don't remember any life flashing before my eyes, I just remember feeling extremely tired and losing vision, I felt so at peace and relaxed like it was a dream and I was ready to pass on if you will, not caring about what my death would mean to my family and all my friends.

Even though it was a severe situation, I've never felt so at peace and calm before in my life and I honestly can't wait to die just to experience that feeling again.

godenviesme

Outside And Away

I had a near death experience when I was about 5- I was drowning in a pool. I probably didn't have enough memories at that point for anything to flash before my eyes, and I was also very focused on trying to get my head above the water again. I remember looking up at the sky through the water, that the surface started to look geometric/like tesselations. Then I experienced some sort of depersonalization - I had a distinct feeling that I was outside of my body, and I watched what happened next (my mom saving me) from a distance.

winkythebichonfrise

A Relationship With What's Next

I was a passenger in a car driving home from holiday to celebrate my high school graduation, when the car swerved and the driver hit an embankment. The car flew into the air and bounced off the ground three times, and I was asleep when it happened. I should have at least been hospitalised, and when ambulances (for the driver), police and passersby stopped, everyone mentioned how its a miracle that we were alive at all.

But when it was happening, I didn't have time to open my eyes before I experienced a violent force I couldn't have imagined (kinda felt like I was put in a metal box and shaken around, you know, which is what was happening) and my head was so weirdly clear, I just had this intense feeling of like, God no the car is crashing.

This is happening, and I didn't feel any pain (I got banged up significantly) and I had this unbelievably overwhelming feeling that I was not ready to die, I was going to get out of that car, that my life was not over, and it was like my soul just said, "No."

I'm not exactly religious, but I've always tried to form a 'relationship' with at least my idea of God, and in those incredibly fast, confusing seconds, idk if it was my brain doing what humans brain do when they freak out, but I really felt like I was talking to God when I thought, "Not today, thank you, I'm not ready." It was such a peaceful, intense presence, and I've never been the same since. I can't ever forget that feeling like I was not alone, and I really want to believe I'm right about that.

veganconnor

Void

There was absolutely nothing. No light, no memories, nothing. It was like a didn't exist for about an hour or so. I didn't experience the passing of time either, so the entire time I was dead seemed like an instant. It was sort of like teleporting into the future.

Bass_Thumper

A Shared Dream

May be a little late to the thread, but my dad flat-lined with a failing heart. When they brought him back the doctor asked where he had been. My dad said he was picking blueberries with his long deceased mother and his sister. 1000 miles away that sister woke up in the middle of the night, woke her husband and said something was wrong with her brother. She had been dreaming that she was picking blueberries with my dad and their mom. I get teary eyed every time I tell that story. He died a few months later. Miss ya, Dad.

Canonboy621

Turn Back

I bled to death after a car accident. I went somewhere. I can't say for sure if it was real or just a weird chemical trip in my brain but the best way I can describe it was like being in a hallway made out of space. It was beautiful, and incredibly peaceful. I saw flecks of memories passing by me but I wasn't focused on them. Then a womans voice that felt like it was everywhere told me I could wake up and suddenly I was alive again.

Shes_dead_Jim

The State Of Death

I remember slipping into a relaxed, giddy state, a place where it felt OK to not worry about a thing because it didn't really exist or mean anything anyway. It was a detachment while also being aware of people around me tending to me, discussing me amongst themselves, and I just submitted my body to them while my mind enjoyed this totally chill, at peace, dreamlike state. I imagine it was due to blood loss and shock but it was interesting all the same. I often wonder if its a state we enter naturally near to death, and if it is, I'm OK with that 👍

sniffing_dog

Lethifold

Giphy

I had my heart stopped. At the hospital because my heart was going 150 bpm for hours. I even had the read out printed out of me flatlining. I had a heart condition and was on acid.

My life did not flash before my eyes. It felt like a black cloud spreading through my body (the heart stopping injection ). Which makes no sense. I should note I have over 4 years drug and alcohol free now. But when it was over the doctor was walking out of the room turned to me and said "better living through chemistry, huh?" Crazy experience would not recommend.

gingeronimooo


Pixabay

In life, sometimes there's wrong and "technically not wrong" - and the difference can often be hilarious.

Keep reading... Show less