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People Reveal How They Turned Things Around After Hitting Rock Bottom

Rock bottom is a place we all live in fear of hitting. Still, sometimes it's necessary to hit rock bottom in order to find a way back up. These people went to hell and back again, and are now sharing their inspiring stories of how they came back from everything to make life work.


u/youknopeit asked:

After hitting rock bottom, how did you turn things around? What did it teach you?

Here were some of those stories.


This Too

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My rock bottom was around this time last year - I had just quit an extremely toxic job and had to spend 3 months unemployed. Nobody was hiring in the field I wanted to work in and it became worse when I wasn't even getting a job in fields where they practically hire anybody that can speak English(I'm from Eastern Europe).

I had (and still have her) a girlfriend that wasn't supportive of my situation in any way, she was blasting me for not having a job and that she won't be there to cover for me and that I had to get a job in the supermarket.

Christmas time came and I had to travel to my hometown, unfortunately, 2 days in I got very sick and continued to be sick till after New year.

So on New Year's day, there I was - sick, no job, no money, broken family (my parents had split couple years back, spending time at home is always a bit of a...challenge), girlfriend wasn't with me, my dog was with her, so no dog either, no prospects for a job - nothing. That's was basically my situation for the next month as well.

At that point, I was like - f--- it - if that whole situation didn't kill me - nothing will.

I let my GF know what special kind of a b*tch she was in that period, reminded myself that just like good time, bad times don't last and just kept on trucking. Soon enough I got a job offer, it wasn't ideal but it paid well and I got to go outside of the country for training, which was a great cultural experience.

So remember this guys - no matter how sh*tty it might seem - this too will pass.

dan7ebg

Work Ain't Cheap

I needed a lot of help, and it took a lot of work on my end to find and use it. Everyone talks about how they can help you, but most of it is going to be you or someone that cares about you doing most of the work to get it.

Thus one thing I learned: Talk is cheap. Talk rarely solves anything. You can should, would, could all you want, but words like those don't do shit. It's about what you're capable of, what you can grow to be capable of, and what you actually achieve.

The other: Suffering is one of the greatest teachers in life. You can acclimate yourself to it, it'll make you stronger, better, more resilient. Don't be afraid of it. Seek it out in moderation. Help others through it. Learn from your experience with it, and theirs. Make the world better by being intimate with it. Make it your whetstone.

MeGrindlok

My Own Worst Enemy

I realized I could do more. I had a decent job and a girlfriend. I lost the job and she broke up with me a few months later. I decided I wanted to change my line of work and get into graduate school. I was denied to the schools I wanted and I got rejected at every interview for lack of experience. I moved back in with my Mom and was living off my savings.

I started feeling sorry for myself and acting as if I was doing my best. I was unemployed, living with my mother and burning through my savings. I got the victim mentality. It took me a while to realize that I wasn't doing everything I could and that I could do more. I worked on taking the GRE again and upgraded my resume. I got a better score and was accepted into a program I wanted to get into. Two months later I got the job I wanted and then negotiated for them to pay for my MBA. Five months after starting my new job I met my future wife. We're now engaged and I am months away from graduating with my MBA with honors.

I was holding me back. Don't feel sorry for yourself, do more.

Vlaed

A Second Chance

I'll let you know when I'm out.

I've slowly lost all my savings, now I have a fair bit of debt. I gave up a really good career move for a girl, we ended up dating for like a month then she broke up with me. 2 days later my job decided they didn't have the hours for me so I got fired.

All that I'm holding onto right now is that I'm incredibly hireable I still have my house, and my parents are amazing and have joined me in my financial struggles to help me make ends meet for now and paid off my debt with their savings so I don't owe interest at all, I just owe them.

SanicTehHedgehoge

What You Want, What You Really Really Want

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When I hit rock bottom, I had spent all my money on drugs, was barely working, just gotten out of inpatient care at a psychiatric hospital, spent most of my time high and sleeping and just existing because those activities were better than facing the facts that I had just dropped out of school, cut contact with my toxic parents and moved out of their house and in with a guy I didn't really know.

I woke up broke, no drugs, no food. I realized I needed to get my head out of my a**. I started trying to be healthy, so I finally got up and worked 30 hours a week, so I could support a better diet and find a hobby and save up to go back to school. I contacted the university and they offered me a free intersession course and a scholarship for the following years I go back full-time.

I didn't like my situation so I used it as motivation to get out. Honestly, nobody can care about your well-being more than you. If you want something, you have to at least try and get it. I worked hard at my job (waiter) because nobody else can do it for me. I'm much more independent now and I thoroughly enjoy it. Most importantly, I put myself first.

In a few days I'm moving into my own apartment and in a few weeks starting class. I like to think my hard work is paying off.

rick-mark

Endorphins Make You Happy

Job I hated, was getting fatter, was single, and didn't want to do anything but get high every night. Could feel that depression was setting in. So I realized the way to curb that, that wouldn't be a huge time commitment, would be that I didn't have to change any of my other habits except I had to do 8x100m sprints, every day.

A year later, I was 10 lbs lighter, engaged, and (I didn't know this yet) but about to quit my job to pursue my dream career due to my new support network.

Amazing what injecting a few endorphins will do.

TucsonCat

Just Work Through It

I was 20, I got arrested for driving on a suspended license. When I got home the following morning my mother kicked me out of her home, in January, in the northern midwest. I was homeless for 2 weeks.

Luckily I had good friends that let me couch surf for a while, a good boss that was understanding about me being a few minutes late, and a girlfriend (now my wife) that were there to support me.

Things started turning around when I moved south with the lady and her family. Still hard, couldn't make much of a living at that time, but I learned what it was to be hungry, and that I didn't want to be there again. Tried to join the military, made it into basic and washed out. Taught me to have a backup plan always (I didn't). Finally moving back to the Northern Midwest and getting back into school taught me that you can make it on your own if you just work through it.

I learned from all of it. And I know that I don't want to go back. You can too. Always.

MaximLucille

Day By Day

I was a "popular kid" in high school. Had tons of fun at parties made good grades and landed in the college of my choosing. Then i decided buy a bit of bud to celebrate making it to college. My dumb *ss also thought to sell some on the side to make some money back on it. By no means was I a drug dealer, it was my very first time even attempting something like that. I got NARCed out from an undercover student, who was my third-ever customer.

After getting arrested and kicked out of college, on the second official day at that, I made a meek attempt to keep the semester going at a community college. The problem was I still wanted to party, so instead of homework, I went out and drank. I blamed other people for my predicament and was a self-loather. After 2 months, I stopped going to the community college I was enrolled in, got kicked out of my uncles house, and was homeless. I had a 1.2 GPA, and a probation officer that was going to MTR me and send me to jail for 1 year after failing another piss test.

I realized I had hit rock bottom when I was wasted in an alleyway in Austin, taking to a homeless person 3 times my age about life's bullsh*t at 3am. That moment made me realize that it wasn't anyones fault but mine and only I could change it.

It took me 4 extra hard years. But I ended up making it back to the college that I got kicked out of. I worked 40 hour weeks and I studied my a** off, ignoring going out to drink until I knew for a fact I was solid on school. I ended up graduating with honors and a 3.56 GPA. I exercised twice daily, sometimes three times a day and I am extremely close to receiving my contract for the Navy. I also met the woman of my dreams and am deeply in love. I am telling you now. Never. Ever. Give up. Pick your head up, establish some discipline, and commit. Take it day by day and use the past as a reminder and motivation. You can do it.

Zdubzz19

A Work In Progress

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I hit "rock bottom" when everything kind of came to a head all at once, some time around 2 years ago.

At the time, I was in an over-worked job, on the verge of losing my mental capacities due to various issues, deep in debt and caught up in some legal trouble that required me to attend court for the first time in my life.

I fell into a deep depression and spent about 6 months just "existing" while my life fell apart. I was struggling mentally due to past trauma's and all the current issues with money and my legal problems. To top it all off, I was learning to drive as well, and had my driving test 2 days AFTER going to court. I also put on a lot a weight and lost pretty much all motivation to do anything, and started taking out my anger on those around me. It got bad enough that I considered suicide at one point, which was the breaking point for myself to try and get out of the rut I was in.

But as the saying goes, "When you hit rock bottom the only way is up". I managed to get my legal issues sorted out, after representing myself (thanks to some free legal advise and help from my friends/family) and getting all of that cleared up. My debt issues were much easier to organise that I thought, and while I'm still in debt now I fell much more in control that I did before now. I managed to work through my depression issues, thanks to family/friends and my local doctor, and have been on the recovery end of that since then. I also passed my driving test, which is something I'd put off for almost 10 years due to anxiety issues.

And finally, I started "moving" more and trying to watch what I eat/drink. The latter is easier enough, so I joined a martial arts session [if anything to get out of the house and meet new people], and started running. I managed to drop about 30 lbs fairly quickly and have managed to keep the weight off since then. And to top it off, I trained for around 6 months (Running) and eventually ran my first ever 10k, raising almost £300 for a mental health charity in the process.

So I'm not completely out of the "hole" but I feel a lot better about myself and where my life is heading right now.

DonKiddic

Patcharin Saenlakon / EyeEm / Getty Images

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