IRL

People Share Their Worst 'Wait, Am I The Bad Guy Here?' Moment

Admitting that you're wrong can be a really tough thing for some people. No one likes to admit that they're the bad guy- we're all the heroes in our own story, after all. Though once that realization clicks, there's no going back.


At least you didn't lash out.

"One time I got pissed because I overheard my parents who adopted me talking about going on a trip to the beach. They both knew I had never been. Told my mom how disappointed and pissed I was.

Turns out they were planning a surprise trip for me to go to the beach. I felt so bad."

Kings_Daughter

That sounds weirdly painful.

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"I blew a tic tac through a straw into an old guy's face who was working at a car park booth when I was about 12 and still feel terrible about it a decade and a half later."

SamCropper

Awwww.

"I teach middle school, so I end up having to play the villain a lot. But one time stands out where I actually WAS the bad guy:

Last block of the day, we're working through something that is not terribly interesting. I hear a few whispers and giggles and my teacher sense goes off. Out of the corner of my eye I see that a note is being passed around the class and that's what's causing the distraction. I muster up my best stern teacher face and boom "Put that in your backpack or I'm going to have to take it."

Someone had found out it was my birthday - they made me a lovely card and were all signing it."

ChickaBok

It's not easy having a good time.

"I was out of town and I went into a frozen yogurt place I'd never seen before with so many flavors. I kept asking for sample cups until I'd tried like 20 of them and was only halfway. It was amazingly fun!

I heard a parent giving a lecture to their kids who wanted to copy me about 'how we don't act like that man and buy ours' That just ruined it for me, so I dropped a $10 in their tip jar and left."

Judah77

Don't waste the popcorn.

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"I went to the movies with some friends when I was 13. Instead of US being the typical annoying loud teenagers, there were some loud women sitting in the row ahead. I didn't hear the women, but my friend pointed them out and complained to me. In retaliation, I threw a handful of popcorn at the women and cackled like a madwoman.

Turns out I misread where my friend was pointing, and I didn't hit the annoying loud women. I hit two quiet old ladies.

I felt like such an butthole."

Assrocket33r

That always seems to happen.

"I was in Tijuana drinking it up and this was in the 90s. I left a bar and when I made it outside, I realized that I left my wallet on the table.

I went back in and saw that different people were there and no wallet. I asked them if they found a wallet and all said no. I got more aggressive with them and started to threaten them if they didn't return the wallet. I was a big guy in those days and I could tell they were scared.

By this time, the bouncer is noticing and I recognize that I'd likely get thrown out soon. So I told them that I'd be waiting for them outside and would beat their butts.

I went outside and was looking in to scare them and plus I was pissed. I then reached in my shirt pocket because I felt something there. Sure enough, my wallet was in there."

Stuntedatpuberty

A dumbass indeed.

"I was a dumb teenager once.

My sister was telling me that one of our neighbors was gay. Being the dumb guy I was, wanting some cheap attention from rumor-mongering, I tried to spread it to a friend. She went up to him that moment and ratted me out.

Turns out, my sister was mad at him because he refused her advances.

I learned a thing, I guess."

Lickerbomper

"Crazy" is a relative term.

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"This goes back to my first (real) girlfriend when we were 15.

We were on and off for three years all throughout high school. She'd had a reputation for being "crazy" because she'd punched a boyfriend she had before me. All the "bros" warned me not to date her.

I did anyway. But, in true teenage douchebag fashion, we went through periods where I would hide our relationship because she was "crazy" and I didn't want to have a public relationship with her.

In retrospect, she was an absolute sweetheart. Any "crazy" behavior from her was absolutely a reaction to how douchey guys treated her, 100% including me.

She was a catch. I was an utter peanutbutter-and-butthole sandwich to her. I still feel bad about it.

We're still casual acquaintances today but I really don't know how to apologize for how I acted 20 years ago. I feel like the statute of limitations has expired and it would be super awkward now."

FastWalkingShortGuy

That's what we call karma.

"Once while working as a line cook in a restaurant a coworker said something to me (I don't remember what but I do know it wasn't anything bad) and for pretty much no reason at all I smacked him in the side of the face with a raw, marinated chicken breast. I dunno, I guess I though it would be funny.

Pretty much immediately I realized I did not live in the Monty Python universe and hitting people with raw chicken (especially for no reason) was generally an a-hole thing to do.

It sort of worked out though. Karma came around a couple weeks later when through a series of unlikely events I ended up having an entire chocolate cake fall on my head. Still covered in chunks of cake and icing I immediately sought out coworker and asked him if we were even; he almost pissed himself laughing and we actually became work friends."

LJGHunter

They left the incel life behind.

"In middle and high school I was a sort of proto-incel, before that was even really a thing (mid-to-late 1990s). I had never had a GF and I was convinced that there was some kind of conspiracy because girls didn't like me. I was super attracted to this one girl in particular, but in true incel fashion I never actually spoke to her; I simply got more and more frustrated over time. Let's call her "Kara".

Anyway, out of the blue one day her (less attractive) best friend and I struck up a conversation, and I saw it as an opportunity. Let's call her "Tina". Tina and I developed a legitimate relationship, but in my mind I would always end up with Kara eventually. Tina was obviously head over heels for me, but I just used her to stay close to Kara.

At some point in all this, Kara did eventually get a BF and I was crushed. I was so angry. I broke up with Tina (shortly after Valentine's Day, no less). It wasn't until a few months later, when I was cleaning out all the notes Tina had sent me, that I realized what a massive jerk I had been.

Tina went on to find a much better man than myself, and I learned some valuable lessons. I'm grateful too, because that incident made me reevaluate myself and my approach to women. There is an alternate universe where I am single and on reddit, whining about "Stacey" instead of treating women like actual people and not just trophies to be won."

felix_mateo

Breaking up is hard to do.

And when you get the law involved, it's even worse. But sometimes people don't need the law's help to make things overcomplicated, they just have a grand ole time making that happen themselves.

People on the front lines of human cruelty include divorce lawyers. These are their stories.

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