It's 2017, So Here Is The First Baby In The World With A Genderless ID Card.

Canada (and the world) experienced a monumental moment in history, in what could be the first case of issuing a genderless ID card to a baby, in the world. Little baby Searyl Alti, was given their first health card by Canadian officials, and under the "gender" category, sits a tiny "U" for unassigned, or undetermined. 

Searyl's parent, Kori Doty, believes that doctors shouldn't have the right to assign a baby's gender at birth. 

Via Facebook

Kori Doty is a nonbinary transgender person who identifies as neither male nor female. After giving birth to baby Searyl in November, Doty undertook a lengthy battle to keep their child's government documents gender-free. 

In an interview with CKNW News, Doty explained, "Were not actually asking to have anyones ID changed against their will. Were just asking to change the structure of how identification, particularly the birth certificate, starts out."

Human rights lawyer, barbara findlay (name intentionally stylized without capital letters), spoke about this huge step forward. In an interview with Buzzfeed News, findlay said that taking gender and sex off of identification documents recognizes "that the state has no business certifying a child's sex at birth. It is something that is private and that might change."

At least two other Canadian provinces, Ontario and Alberta, are now also considering offering a third, nonbinary option on government documents.

 Kori Doty / Via facebook.com

"We would prefer they take 'sex' off these documents entirely," findlay said. "A baby's gender identity develops over time, not when a doctor examines its genitals right after birth."

Doty told the CBC that they felt inspired to make sure their child's documents were genderless, because the doctors who delivered them, assigned them an incorrect gender that, "followed me and followed my identification throughout my life." 

Doty wants to make sure that their child doesn't go through this, and has the freewill to choose how they identify. 

Doty told the CBC, "I'm raising Searyl in such a way that until they have the sense of self and command of vocabulary to tell me who they are, I'm recognizing them as a baby and trying to give them all the love and support to be the most whole person that they can be outside of the restrictions that come with the boy box and the girl box."

Way to go, Doty! 

We are told that, if you're not confident, you should just "fake it til you make it."

This is great--in theory. In practice, sometimes "faking it" can have extremely real and terrible consequences, which these people found out the hardest of hard ways.

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