Older Than Stonehenge?! Here Is A Collection Of The Oldest Things We've Discovered.

The Earth has been around for an incomprehensible length of time. So long in fact, that if the creation of the earth was at midnight, and the present day were 24 hours later, humankind would only have appeared 1 minute and 17 seconds ago. 

So discovering ancient artefacts from before humans and during our earliest years on this planet, historians are able to paint a clearer picture of what life was really like in the past. 

Here are some of the oldest things on the planet. Some are animals, some are objects. All are fascinating and paint an amazing picture of the past.

These unique looking socks are around 16,000 years old, which is incredible for a number of reasons. They look to be preserved very well and the vibrant red colour is very striking amongst our ideas of what things looked like back then. 

Plus there's the weird toe split thing, which would have been appropriate for sandals common at the time. (That's right, Socks and Sandals are much older than you thought.)

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The first prosthetic toe was discovered in a tomb in Egypt. Although the wooden appendage appeared to be just cosmetic, Researchers discovered it was practical after testing it with volunteers.

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This 5,000 year-old discarded piece of chewing gum was discovered by archaeology students digging in Finland.

Experts believe this could have been used to heal mouth infections, as well as gluing broken pots together.

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These Stone Masks, probably used for ancestral rituals, are over 9000 years old! They were around even before written language. 

Experts believe this was how some families proved their ownership of their land, by making a mold of their ancestor's facial features and using it to draw similarities in their own face.

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This Globe, carved on an ostrich egg, seems to be the first representation of the full world as we know it today. 

While not thousands of years old, the globe is still the oldest example we have of how we perceive our modern world.

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Llareta is a relative of Parsley that consists of thousands of flowering buds in the Andes Mountains. 

It takes a century for the thick green growth to grow a metre, which means that the massive blobs of it in these mountains are over 2,000 years old.

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The Great Basin Bristlecone Pine is the oldest living tree species on earth. Located in California, Nevada and Utah, the oldest specimen of this tree is 5066 years old.

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Adwaita was an Aldabra Giant Tortoise that lived to be about 255 years old. He died in 2006, but was old enough to have sailed with the East India Company and reside in India's first Zoo.

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The oldest surviving instrument is a Mammoth Bone Flute from nearly 40,000 years ago. This was discovered in a cave near Germany, leading archaeologists to believe they were discarded during the first movement of humans from Africa into central Europe.

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The Venus of Hohle Fels is the oldest surviving sculpture of the Human Form. The only earlier example of this kind of carving is the Lion-Man of the Hohlenstien-Stadel, which depicts a man with a Lion's head. 

The Venus is about 35,000 to 40,000 years old and reflects the beliefs in fertility, beauty and the female form. It's carved from a Mammoth Tusk and shows us when Humans started making art from real things around them.

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Although it may not look like something you'd want to put on your car, this is actually the earliest discovered wheel. 

Between 5100 and 5350 years old, this wheel is made of Ash and Oak and was found with an Axel nearby. 

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This Copper Awl is significant for a number of reasons. It's the oldest human-made artifact that contains metal, but what's even more interesting is that the metal came from almost 600 miles away.

This was found buried with a woman who appeared to be very important. Her grave was located in a grain silo, a treatment reserved for influential members of the community.

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Long before the discovery of paper or the printing press, maps were carved out on stone tablets. This particular map shows the landscape of Spain, etched into a 14,000 year old sandstone tablet.

Although it looks like a bunch of scribbles, the map was presumably readable to early humans.

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Clonal Tree colonies are groups of trees that are all connected by a single root system. There is debate over whether or not this entire forest is a single organism, but there is no dispute over it's age. Pando is the name of this colony and it's estimated to have been standing for over 80,000 years!

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An ancient crystal discovered in Australia is estimated to be 4.4 BILLION years old! That would make it the oldest material ever discovered on earth. The chemical composition of it reveals a lot about the earth's atmosphere at the time of it's formation and analyzing this is incredibly important for today's scientists and historians.

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This 'Swiss Army Knife' actually predates Switzerland itself and was created in the Roman Empire around 200 A.D. The Multitool contains a Spoon, Knife, Spatula and a toothpick.

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The Sima De Los Huesos in Spain is the oldest collection of human remains on earth, which means that we've made some incredible discoveries with it.

One of these discoveries was made by analyzing the DNA of 430,000 year-old teeth and thigh bones, making it the oldest DNA sample we have accessed. The genome sequence tells us that Humans and Neanderthals split much earlier than the original estimates, resetting the Ancestral family tree.

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The World's oldest pair of sunglasses were discovered in Canada's Baffin Island. They were apparently used to combat extreme glare from the snow that could cause snow-blindness. 

They look pretty futuristic though.

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In Ireland, there stands a monument older than both Stonehenge and the Pyramids. Newgrange, much like Stonehenge, has baffled archaeologists about its original use for years. It was apparently constructed between 3200 and 3100 B.C.

The circular stone mound is complete with inner passageways that contain human remains. There's also an ancient skylight that lights up the caverns on the Winter Solstice. Because of this, it's assumed that the mound held religious significance to people of the time. 

Also, there's neat artistic inscriptions that have survived on the stones.

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In 2006, a clam by the name of Ming was recovered from the sea that turned out to be 507 years old! The clam was so named because it was born during the Chinese dynasty under Emperor Ming.

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One of the most important recent discoveries in Palaeontology is the age of one of the earliest dinosaur fossils. The discovery pushes the oldest known dinosaurs back a few million years, back to 240 Million years ago!

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It seems like it's very common for sea creatures to live for seemingly forever. No exception to this rule are the Glass Sponges, who's unique structure is different enough from regular Sea Sponges that they have earned their own biological classification. 

Ages for the creatures are disputed, with the oldest estimate being at 23,000 years. This was deemed 'Impossible' by the scientific community, so the age was officially listed at a measly 15,000 years. 

Much less impressive.

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Joining the club of ridiculously old sea creatures is the Turritopsis dohrnii, also known as the 'Immortal Jellyfish'. This unique fishy blob is able to completely Benjamin-Button itself into a younger version of the jellyfish that is able to reproduce and grow old, repeating this cycle indefinitely. 

Although the oldest of this species hasn't been identified, it is essentially immortal and was originally discovered in 1880.

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One of the earliest surviving written texts may surprise you. Carved on a stone tablet in Mesopotamia is a recipet for...beer. Turns out that pre-historic people loved the bitter drink as much as modern man does. 

The tablet (known as the Alulu tablet)is about 3900 years old and contains the price of beer and the quantity. It's a fascinating example of how similar early civilizations were to us in both the way they acquired goods, and the goods they consumed themselves.

The tablet also claims that the beer is the 'Best' in the ancient city, so apparently marketing hasn't changed either.

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Patcharin Saenlakon / EyeEm / Getty Images

Racism is an insidious, and unfortunately prevalent, force in all of our daily lives. Maybe we're on the receiving end of it, being treated differently and losing opportunities because of others' preconceived notions.

Or maybe we're on the other side of things. Even those who aren't actively racist or discriminatory still have to process the world through the filters of the things they've been told about people who are different.

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