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Travelers Share The Biggest Culture Shock They've Experienced

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The first time you travel outside of your comfort zone, it's amazing. Amazing, but very different. And that difference takes some getting used to--some have a better time with it than others.


u/fashce1 asked the travelers of Reddit:

What is the biggest culture shock you have ever faced?

Here were some of the answers.

Magic Carp

Visiting family in the Czech Republic around Christmastime. Went to use washroom and was utterly astounded to see a giant carp swimming around in their bathtub. Learned it is customary to eat fried carp on Christmas Eve.

rich_da_hoser

Delicious, At Any Time Of Day

How much quality food there is at Japanese 7-11. Yes you heard me, QUALITY. Obviously here in the US you don't trust gas station sushi or really any food that comes from them. Honestly a vagabond or tourist can easily survive eating only 7-11 food in Japan, since really it's cheap and not as processed.

optionalhero

So Not Weird

When I visited South America it was my first time experiencing that you throw your toilet paper in a trash bin next to the toilet specifically for that rather than flush it and mess up their sewage infrastructure

It's so weird but not weird at the same time since its just how things work there.

myleskilloneous

Ah, Good Ol' Boston

I went into an an ice cream shop in Boston that was staffed by an older lady, we'll call er her OL, the exchange went like this:

OL: Hi how aw ya?

Me: I'm great, and you?

OL:<no answer>

Me: Do you have blueberry cheesecake ice cream?

OL: Do you see it on the board? If it's not on the board then we don't f*cking have it

Bob_12_Pack

Public Vs. Private

Working in the public sector. I previously worked in hospitality as a restaurant manager. The change to go working into a 9-5 office job was extraordinarily tough. People were so awkward and shy, I used to greet every staff member with a handshake previously but now everyone in my office can't make eye contact. Public Sector for me is the most 'be careful what you say' environment regarding absolutely anything even your plans for the weekend...

SheenoW_

A Garbage Time

I live in a very clean city, so I was shocked When I visited South America and saw how dirty it was and how much people litter.

People there literally do not give a sh*t and will just throw their trash right on the ground... Even if there's a trash can 10 ft away.

I was on a bus in Colombia and this lady was throwing trash out the window the whole 12 hr bus ride even though there was a garbage bag across the aisle from her.

In Brazil I was on a boat ride on the Amazon and our engine got clogged up. They stop the boat pull the engine up and there's a black trash bag wrapped around the motor. The driver proceeds to take the bag off and throw it right back in the river before starting the boat and taking off.

I also remember seeing people just chucking huge bags of trash right into the Amazon River...No sh*ts given.

It's really sad because it's beautiful in South America. A lot places there just don't have the money/infastruture to properly take care of their waste.

tornadoquake23

Traffique

Traffic in Vietnam. Crossing the street by walking slowly, letting the overloaded scooters drive around me, I got used to relatively quick. But the overnight bus from Hanoi to Danang crisscrossing the highway, having near misses with incoming trailers and honking every third second, that was bad.

krakenftrs

Welcome To Japan, My Friend.  Welcome...To Japan

First time in Japan, first interaction with anyone outside of the airport:

Get there early in the morning, LOOOONG flight and have a meeting in an hour. Need coffee asap. Go to 7-11 (awesome! they have that here!) before checking into hotel. Guy at the counter greets me. I'm looking around for the coffee. Guy runs around counter, eager to help me in any way. "Cofffee" I say. He takes me to the coffee, points to the different types, gets a cup for me, shows me how to use the machine, practically holding my hand through the process. Get me all set up with a fresh coffee, runs back around counter. shows me the little tray to put my money in, helps me count my money. Runs back around counter, leads me to door, opens it for me and bows with traditional goodbye and arigatou gozaimasu.

WOW, welcome to Japan.

davewtameloncamp

Aggressive Aggression

I grew up in a working class city where passive-aggression wasn't a thing. If people didn't like you they made it obvious. Shouting matches and fist-fights were pretty common. Then I get a job at a snooty ivy league university and nobody expresses what they actually think or feel, snide remarks replaced insults, people quietly conspire against you while pretending to be your friend, and you can't call people out on their bullshit without getting socially shunned because everybody is neck deep swimming in it.

signture_for_all

More Engrained Than Ever

As the only American at a company in rural Japan: the sexism.

Everyone wears uniforms, women have to wear skirts.

In the company phone directory there is a special symbol to indicate if someone is a woman.

Women leave the office at 5 or 530. Men all work later.

Women are very unlikely to be promoted. There is only one female manager in the entire company.

When a women gets married 90% of the time they quit the company.

If a married woman's husband's parents die the company sends a card and money. If her own parents die they send nothing.

Women must serve tea and clean the office spaces.

Constantly being called "kawaii", cute, beautiful, and "~chan" by male co-workers.

Etc.

P1kachuchuchu

Bussing

Holidaying in Tokyo and watching 5 year old kids walk themselves home from school and catching public transport...all by themselves.

smooth_source

This is actually common in most countries outside of the US. My city here in Germany has one of the US' largest bases, and every morning you'll only see the American parents guarding their children (guessing 7-13) until the bus comes to pick them up. It's a typical American school bus which looks completely different from our regular city busses, so they should be able to easily teach their kids "get on the yellow bus and not the white/green/blue ones" but hovering around your kids just isn't 'normal' here.

Kids have keys to their homes, learn where they live, how to get there and back at a pretty young age unless of course there's no public transport close enough and the parents have to come pick them up.

-captn-

Street Traffic 

I spent 12 weeks backpacking in India. The most intense culture shock was when I returned to the US. There were no people outside! The streets felt deserted. In India every city street is just packed with people. I had a second wave of culture shock was when I went to the grocery store for bread and the aisle was 25 feet long and had dozens of varieties. Lots of stuff I used to take for granted suddenly felt like such a blessing.

ALasagnaForOne

"It wasn't me!"

There's not much you can do when the righteous fist of the law comes down on you. Call it a mix-up, or call it a mistake, if someone's pegged you at the scene of a crime there's not much you can do but trust the justice system to prove you innocent. However, that's a gamble, and just because you've been given a "not guilty" doesn't mean the effects won't follow you for the rest of your life.

Reddit user, u/danbrownskin, wanted to hear about the times when it wasn't you, seriously, it was someone else, when they asked:

Redditors who were once considered suspect of a crime they did not commit, what's it like being held under suspicion and how did it affect your life?

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