IRL

People Who Work With Dead Bodies Share Their Most Unsettling Stories

Do they talk back?

I see dead people! That isn't merely a famous movie tagline. It's some people's everyday reality. There are careers out there that include dealing with and handling dead bodies on a daily basis. The dead are what pays the bills. It takes a person with a certain type of fortitude (and lack of a gag reflex) to be able to have the dead as you co-worker. When most people would run screaming from a corpse, these people embrace them. And the stories a dead body tells, are never dull.

Redditor u/Fun_Stick wanted to hear from those who work with people who have passed on by wondering.... People who frequently come in contact with dead bodies in your profession, what's the creepiest/most unsettling story that you have?


#MeToo in Death....

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I had a body's arm tied up during dissection so that I could use both hands for dissection. To get a better picture, he was doing a T pose so that I could get at his axillary lymph nodes. It was dark in the lab and the only light I had on was the one above the body. And I was alone. And then someone slapped my butt.

The string had snapped and the gentleman's hand came down around me. I screamed loud enough to alert the woman down the hall. Brain_Sci3nc3s

Cut Loose....

Family member of a friend who worked at a morgue said that frequently, because bodies still have air trapped in them at the time of death, they would make a brief moaning noise. So it sounds like they're alive and groaning but it's just the gas escaping. mdk106

A scene straight out of "7"

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I used to intern for the FBI when I was in college and I only saw bodies at the morgue. However, there was this one time one of the agents brought us along to a serious case they had. When we entered the morgue he told us to stand back. The body had just entered and you could smell it instantly.

I know it's not creepy, but that was the first time I smelled a decomposing body. It was of someone who was left to drown in lake. ghostoflops

RIP

Did a pathology rotation in med school, which included a week in the morgue to help with autopsies. Ended up cutting on and holding the brain of one of my high school classmates. Didn't realize it until halfway through when I noticed the tag on the table. That hit me like a truck.

Also weird was then going home and seeing the tributes and RIP messages about him on facebook. papasmurf826

They are a Lifetime Movie.... 

Had a neighbor who was from Australia, he was found dying and in a state of rambling delirium. When they had to move the body, they found out that his lower body has rotted and moving it slightly caused the rotten flesh and muscles to just easily rip away. The upper body was pale and you could see the veins through, his head was mostly purple from the bruises he got banging his head on the head and wall. His family agreed to a cremation (which the morgue didn't chart them for) and his ashes flew back to Australia.

His Philipina girlfriend is in prison and along with her accomplices are in the process of getting their final verdict. The girlfriend drugged him and left he shackled to his bed, reports say she tried to kill him to get his life insurance and pension, when in reality she can't get that at all.

The house he died in was torn down and was blessed numerous times before a house was built. illogicalfuturity

Beyond Recognition.... 

Not my experience, but a guy I've worked with for years is retired detective. They found a body that was beaten really really bad, couldn't even see the guys face, he was barely alive. They brought him (the body) back to the hospital and they tried to save him but he didn't make it. When the nurse took the wallet out of the pocket to check the ID, she realized it was her son the entire time. He was beaten so bad she didn't recognize him. Guy said he had to retire after that it was the worst thing he's had to witness. Can't even imagine being that mother. rae9blf

11?

Work in a funeral home and after awhile you grow a thicker skin to what you see. You have to if you want to get on with your day. However, one case messed with me for awhile. When you hear of decomposing bodies, you think of shut-ins or sadly murder victims who have been left to rot. You don't think of children. We had a little 11 year old kid who was put with his family when his mother had to go to treatment. He committed suicide and no one noticed he was gone for days. An 11 year old kid, who should have been playing hockey or video games with his friends. Being happy and carefree and loved. Rotting away for days.

My nephew was his age at the time and I hugged him extra tight. I still think of him from time to time. Wackydetective

Swollen Balloons.....

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My uncle is a retired constable. He said back in the seventies when he was doing his police training he had to watch an Autopsy being conducted as part of the training. I guess to see if he could actually stomach it.

The body they were using had been dead quite a few weeks. The smell was horrendous, it had also had a substantial gas build up JamesWells1994


T. M. I. 

Funeral director here. A man who died of a heart attack in his home while showering. Very isolated house, water kept running for days. He was completely melted by the time we got him. Human goo.

Less gory but on a regular basis, when they open their eyes when moved, and stare right into your soul with their dead eyes. Always creeps me out no matter how many hundreds I've handled.

OOH I just remembered one, but it wasn't me, it was a colleague of mine. Full summer heat, body was left for days in his apartment, smelled all the way to the street from the 4th floor. When they moved him the skin from his face slipped and fell and my colleague slipped on it (like on a banana peel). He had to take the rest of the day off.

I keep remembering stuff. My former boss told me about one guy who jumped of his building, like straight up, and on impact his legs just got crushed upward and his tibias pierced through his skull. BetsyZZZ

Patcharin Saenlakon / EyeEm / Getty Images

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